City water customers


Drinking Water Report
The City of Shorewood obtains its water from seven wells. The water is then pumped into the distribution system following chlorinating and fluoridating. Chlorine and fluoride levels are tested regularly and water samples are sent to the Minnesota Department of Health for bacteria testing.

Residents are able to view yearly testing results conducted on city water. The current drinking water report is available. Paper copies are at city hall, or you can call the city, 952.960.7900, to request a copy by mail. Please direct water questions to Larry Brown, Director of Public Works, 952.960.7913

Public Works and Your Water
The Shorewood Public Works Department is responsible for maintaining safe drinking water and reliable sewage disposal. This department operates and maintains the city’s seven water wells, two storage reservoirs, the water distribution system and the sanitary sewer collection system. Staff is also responsible for the water meter reading and repair program.

Discolored water
Brown or yellow water is not visually appealing, but is rarely a concern. Generally it is caused from iron deposits released from water pipes. If your water is discolored, run the cold water at a faucet closest to the water meter or on the lowest level of your home. If after five minutes the water is to clear, wait for an hour and try again. If water is still discolored, contact the city public works department, 952.960.7900.

Concerns About Lead in Water
The most recent occurrence of lead in drinking water for Flint, Michigan has many consumers asking the question, “Is there lead or other contaminants in the water that I consume?”  This occurrence also highlights the importance of this resource that we depend on to meet basic needs and sustenance of life. Learn More

City Water and Hardness/Iron Levels
If your home has city water and you have a water softener, the softening level should be set at 22. Iron level for city water is .28 parts per million. Other water questions may be directed to public works at 952.960.7913.

Water leaks
If  you notice unexplained high water usage in your home you may have an undetected leak. The number one reason is a running toilet, but other hidden leaks not only waste water and cost you money, they can cause expensive damage to your home. Learn more